We ask God to direct our thinking, especially asking that it be divorced from self-pity, dishonest or self-seeking motives.
– Alcoholics Anonymous p. 86
When said sincerely, this prayer teaches me to be truly unselfish and humble, for even in doing good deeds I often used to seek approval and glory for myself. By examining my motives in all that I do, I can be of service to God and others, helping them do what they want to do. When I put God in charge of my thinking, much needless worry is eliminated ad I believe He guides me throughout the day. When I eliminate thoughts of self-pity, dishonesty and self-centeredness as soon as they enter my mind, I find peace with God, my neighbor and myself.
End of quote.

Looking at my motives is always a good thing for me to do, it helps to clarify my intentions, or my goals. Manipulation was a tool that I used freely, and always with full justification for my behavior. Being self-centered can sneak up on me under the disguise of being of service to others. I have to check myself, constantly, to make sure that I am being of service to others, and not just trying to bolster my sagging ego by appearing to be helpful. Sometimes I go around and around with this thinking, until I finally realize that what it takes is some sort of action, and how that is defined is not as important as the act itself. How I may define as act can be very different from how others see my action. I try to get out of my head and into doing something that can be of use to others. When I quit thinking about me, me, me; I can change my thought pattern by simply focusing on what I can do, or to put it another way – I can attempt to do the “next right thing.”Being humble and unselfish does not come naturally to me. It takes concerted effort, and sometimes it simply takes a “head down, elbows out” stance whereby I do not “think myself into apoplexy,” but go forward in faith.♥

Photo Courtesy of Tom R

Photo Courtesy of Tom R

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