Many in recovery regard the 6th and 7th Steps as evidence of the program’s divine inspiration, for when the book Alcoholics Anonymous was written only two short paragraphs were devoted to these Steps. None of the contributors had been sober more than a couple of years at the time. They lacked the experience to appreciate the real value of these steps. But by the time Bill W. wrote Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions several years later, he had enough sober living under his belt to understand their importance and to give both Steps their due.

This repeated application of the 7th Step is so important: First, for our sobriety, because when we stop actively seeking humility, we start feeding our egos . . . and once we break out in a rash of self-will, a return to drinking usually follows (or gambling, or eating, etc.). Second, for the sake of our continuous spiritual growth, because when we stagnate spiritually, we stop being helpful to others – families, friends, colleagues, and communities – and without that deeper purpose we deprive ourselves of the richest rewards life has to offer.
(excerpt from the Serenity Web)

Photo courtesy of Maggs

Photo courtesy of Maggs

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