Humbly Asked

(Reflection courtesy of Bill M)

When I humbly asked God to remove my shortcomings I used the seventh step prayer.
“My Creator, I am now willing that you should have all of me, good and bad. I pray that you now remove from me every single defect of character which stands in the way of my usefulness to you and my fellows. Grant me strength, as I go out from here, to do your bidding. Amen.”
The asking was simple because I had become willing in Step 6. I had learned in the fellowship that asking for assistance is not a sign of weakness, but an indication of growth and strength.

Humbly took some work. Humbly is from Latin (Humilis), which is from the Latin word for earth (humus). Synonyms for humble are modest, down-to-earth. When I am humble, I am not lower or better than someone else, I am right sized. I do not think too much or too little of myself. I found myself saying the seventh step prayer when I was disgusted with myself. Not humble. When I thought too much of myself I would forget to say the prayer at all. Not humble.

When I humbly ask, I am not demanding defects be removed. I am patient. Defects are removed in God’s time not mine. I am responsible for the action not the result. Humility means I am teachable.

Praying hands

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7 thoughts on “Humbly Asked

  1. APRIL 13
    THE FALSE COMFORT OF SELF-PITY
    Self-pity is one of the most unhappy and consuming defects
    that we know. It is a bar to all spiritual progress and can
    cut off all effective communication with our fellows because
    of its inordinate demands for attention and sympathy. It is a
    maudlin form of martyrdom, which we can ill afford.
    AS BILL SEES IT, p. 238

    Oh how I used to bewail, moan and groan and always reach for more of this maudlin form of martyrdom we seem to somehow sickeningly justify or give me a right to drink in almost any and all circumstances.
    (By now I imagine a lot of people are saying they just wonder how long I will continue to beat myself up about this but believe me if I don’t remember my last drunk which this warped thinking was part of, I may not have had it).

    It’s very important that we remember what we used to be like, what happened and what we are now like.
    It’s our story!
    It’s our resurrection experience.
    It’s Easter living out in us.

    In part of this story is starting off on a new foot, finding a new direction and purpose in our lives.
    My friend Leo played a large part in this I saying that recovery must be about being positive and creative and in so many ways I have queued on this and found great joy in doing so.

    One of the great joys was being the Santa C. chairperson at our annual seasonal meeting on December 24th for 25 years.

    I received an email this morning with a picture of the old boy, with Susan Sims and a portion of the 12 steps which hang on our walls.

    I’m Harry, grateful alcoholic and devoted 12th stepper.

  2. 13
    April
    THE FALSE COMFORT OF SELF-PITY
    Self-pity is one of the most unhappy and consuming defects that we know. It is a bar to all spiritual progress and can cut off all effective communication with our fellows because of its inordinate demands for attention and sympathy. It is a maudlin form of martyrdom, which we can ill afford.
    — AS BILL SEES IT, p. 238
    The false comfort of self-pity screens me from reality only momentarily and then demands, like a drug, that I take an ever bigger dose. If I succumb to this it could lead to a relapse into drinking. What can I do?
    I can reach to the program of aa, help others, say the 7th step prayer, ask hp to remove my difficulties.
    Thanks Bill for share about humble.

  3. Top of the morning family,
    Inside each of us is a place that is made for one thing. It’s a relationship with the One who created us. Our souls will remain restless until we find our home with Divine Mercy. It’s there. He made us. Self-will masks this relationship with worldly/temporal promises. No matter what I fill it up with or cover it up, pr”I”de will never be satisfied. Our defected character, human weaknesses, and sin block us off from His sunlight. To overcome self, we humble ourselves before Him, confess all the ways that we fall short, and seek His divine/spiritual adjustments.
    It’s a good day to have a good day.

  4. You show me that a most constructive action to 1) address self pity, 2) fill “the hole in the soul” and 3) be useful is to work with another alcoholic.
    It is the essence of our literature. Page 88 concludes, after reminding us that “we alcoholics are undisciplined so we let God discipline us in this simple way” that “Faith without works is dead”.
    Most importantly, in my opinion, having set the stage, it then goes on to state that the next chapter ( Working With Others) is entirely devoted to step twelve.
    So having come into recovery, through the Grace of a power greater than ourselves, we are to do the same for others- we are to love our neighbour as we have been loved.
    We are to actually transcend self, perhaps a helpful indicator of humility, that others may be recovered as we have been.
    I have heard from a venerated Wise Elder that to take our message to the still suffering is, definitionally, to lead a spiritual life.
    Who I am and what I do just may be more helpful than me gassing on about what I believe…oomph, what a thought!
    Grateful for the Gift

  5. I don’t know exactly what humility is, but in my spiritual literature, the guy who was healed of blindness by a little spit, some mud and a Touch, said, “One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.” He didn’t speculate on how, his merit, just gave thanks. And all I know is I was drunk and now I’m not, for 10 years or so. It must be His effort, not mine. If He can do that, surely He can dull this sharp tongue, silence the know-it-all attitude, provide empathy where contempt now dwells. Surely.

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