Willingness To Change

I just have to think of what my old response would be to any given situation, and then do the opposite.  I work towards being of service to others, instead of being so self-centered, there are others with problems also.  I try to be as honest as I can be, which requires backing up to admit my lies and deceptions.  My faith in God and the Program continues to grow and change. Through the amends process I have been able to admit my wrongs and offer to make them right, to the best of my ability.  If I am angry I try to look at what my part might be, and then come to terms with what I can or cannot do.  I have found that my anger is not always justified, and I have learned that backing off a step or two helps.  I trust and am learning to Let Go and Let God when life challenges me. Change in recovery is truly a blessing. One that I am becoming more familiar with.
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5 thoughts on “Willingness To Change

  1. Grapevine Quote

    October 31
    “At the end of each day … I hope that I can say a short prayer of gratitude for another day of sobriety. Anything else good that happens is a bonus.”
    White Rock, British Columbia, May 2005
    “Life–It Happens”
    No Matter What: Dealing with Adversity in Sobriety

    One of the greatest Jewish sages to ever live was a first-century rabbi named Akiva. There are many stories about Akiva, but one is more a tribute to his teacher then about the great sage himself — a man named Nahum Ish Gamzu. – Rabbi Eckstein
    http://www.ifcj.org/learn/holy-land-moments/daily-devotionals/all-for-the-best.html?referrer=http://www.ifcj.org/learn/holy-land-moments/

    Nahum was his real name and Ish means something like “everything happens for the best” so you see he carried this mark with him his whole life.

    I happen to wholeheartedly believe this.
    When I declare in my morning declarations that my times are in his hand, I believe that wholeheartedly.

    On reviewing my whole life as part of the process of the 12 steps I saw the intricacies which were in play to shape and mold me into what I was to become and especially the pathway finally into AA and our precious 12 steps.
    And the beauty of it is, it continues.
    God’s work which is his extreme generosity and blessings never ends.

    As my old sponsor who so were years ago departed our earthly relationship always said, “I get more out of this relationship than any of you ever do”.

    Thank you my friends for being my friends!

    I’m Harry, grateful alcoholic and devoted 12 stepper.

  2. …only my experience…the book says we pause when agitated…for me that doesn’t work as well as “come to a full and complete stop, look both directions, disengage the transmission, set the emergency brake, turn off the ignition, unfasten my seat belt, exit the vehicle and close the door. Then get on my knees and pray for stillness and peace.”
    Maybe, just maybe, that will slow me down enough to regain some sense of humbleness.
    Then I just might have a good idea about how to proceed…usually being to keep my lips sealed and pray even more for the other person, place or thing as well as myself and to listen for His direction.
    Then, I try and gently go about my day.
    Lot less fender benders in my life these days…
    Grateful for the Gift

  3. Grateful to read the lead, SMB, and thanks Harry for the reference to A kiva and scriptures. TI’m I liked the analogy of stopping as I would be driving a car, and for me soul searching is good. Grateful for this 24 and today. Kt

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